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ancientart:

Howling Dog Effigy, Jalisco, 300 BC-AD 200. 

Why were dogs so significant to the Mexica?

Dogs were associated with the god of death, Xolotl, among the Mexicas of the highlands of Mexico. Both a dog and Xolotl were thought to lead the soul to the underworld. The skinny body and white hue of the shown dog represented above may have underworld connotations, connecting it to this belief. Xolotl was also associated by the Mexica with the planet Venus as the evening star, and was portrayed with a canine head.

The dog’s special relationship with humans is highlighted by a number of Colima dog effigies wearing humanoid masks. This curious effigy type has been interpreted as a shamanic transformation image or as a reference to the modern Huichol myth of the origin of the first wife, who was transformed from a dog into a human. However, recent scholarship suggests a new explanation of these sculptures as the depiction of the animal’s tonalli, its inner essence, which is made manifest by being given human form via the mask.

The use of the human face to make reference to an object’s or animal’s inner spirit is found in the artworks of many ancient cultures of the Americas, from the Inuit of Alaska and northern Canada to peoples in Argentina and Chile. (Walters)

On the subject of the significance of dogs, and dog effigies wearing humanoid masks, check out this post from a while back of ‘examples of dogs represented in ancient Mexican art.’ The final artefact here is from Colima, and shows a dog wearing a human mask.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA, via their online collections2009.20.148.

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

my film, DEAF BROWN GURL is finally here! After one year in the making, it’s here for public viewing. ENGLISH & SPANISH subtitles are available for your watching. My film shows the diversity of Indian society (in Patna) and I wanted to show a variety of Indian groups (Muslims, Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists), including Deaf Indians (and myself as a Deaf Indian).

"Deaf Brown Gurl" ("La Morena Sorda") a film written, directed, shot, performed, and edited by Sabina England.

-Voice Over & Sound Design by Micropixie.
-Music by Om/Off (Paco Seren and Pablo Alvarez)
-V.O Recording by Elliott Peltzman.

Filmed in India (Old Delhi, India and Patna, Bihar, India)

Sabina England
http://www.sabinaengland.com/ (Website)
https://www.facebook.com/sabinaengland (Facebook)
https://twitter.com/sabinaengland (Twitter)

Micropixie
http://www.micropixie.com/ (Website)
https://www.facebook.com/Micropixie (Facebook)
https://twitter.com/micropixie (Twitter)

Om/Off (from Spain/desde España)
http://inidicia.wix.com/omoff (Website)
https://www.facebook.com/omoff (Facebook)
https://twitter.com/pacoseren (Twitter)

please “like” my FB page, and you can also follow my Instagram (link)

Thanks for the support & reblogs, everyone. The comments I got on the video were wonderful.

standwithpalestine:

Israeli settlers - who live illegally on Palestinian land and shouldn’t be there in the first place - regularly destroy and uproot olive trees belonging to Palestinians, often striking at night to go unnoticed.

Olive trees are a livelihood for many families, and a key component of the Palestinian economy. That’s how they are meant to survive. 

These attacks are by no means limited to agriculture. They also burn and vandalize churchesmosques, homescars and… cemeteries

I saved the worst for last. Israeli soldiers escort Israeli settlers to attack Palestinians then stand by and watch, if not join in too

According to the UN the annual rate of Israeli settler attacks against Palestinians has almost quadrupled in eight years.

GIFs from 5 Broken Cameras (2011)

natya:

Kuchipudi

Dancer: Yamini Reddy

Photographer: unknown

the-indigo-dragonfly:

Tomoe Gozen  巴御前- onna bugeisha

Tomoe Gozen was a female samurai during the Genpei War of 1180–1185 CE. Though female warriors were not uncommon in Japan at the time, Tomoe is one of very few female samurai, highly trained and skilled in horseback riding, archery, sword fighting and she was also greatly skilled in the use of the naginata, which is a long staff with a curved blade at one end. Tomoe Gozen beheaded many enemies with naginata, because she didn’t believe in staying behind in battles, she was always at the fore front of any battle line.
She was a senior captain under general Minamoto no Yoshinaka, and either his attendant or consort as well, depending on the source. Her surname is not known, as Gozen is simply a title, somewhat like “Lady.”

The earliest written source regarding Tomoe Gozen is from the 14th century Japanese classic, The Tale of the Heike, which in turn is derived from oral tradition. This source describes her as almost supernaturally strong, very beautiful, and surpassing her male colleagues in skill and bravery.

The Heike Monogatari goes on to say that Tomoe was one of the last five of Yoshinaka’s warriors standing at the tail end of the Battle of Awazu, and that Yoshinaka, knowing that death was near, urged her to flee. Though reluctant, she rushed a Minamoto warrior named Onda no Hachirô Moroshige, cut his head off, and then fled for the eastern provinces.

Some have written that Tomoe in fact died in battle with her husband, while others assert that she survived and became a nun.

She is among the most popular and widely known female figures in Japanese history/legend, and appears as the lead in at least one kabuki play, Onna Shibaraku

mma-gifs:

Five Mae Mai Techniques

“Culture doesn’t make people; people make culture.”

archaeologicalnews:

TEHRAN — A 5,000-year-old water system has been unearthed during a rescue excavation project at the Farash ancient historical site at Seimareh Dam reservoir area in western Iran.

The discovery was made by an archaeological team led by Leili Niakan during the second season of excavation work…

Applying ohaguro (お歯黒), from The Sun, June 1972

Scan by Bika Bika

postwhitesociety:

youcantroamwithoutcaesar:

I don’t care how connected you think you are to a culture, if it’s not the one you were raised in you have no claim to it. That’s not a hard concept

say it again